Posts Tagged 'children'

#blogjune: post 25: A cardigan: lost property at a library conference #SLAYLG17

It was a first, I’ve never been to a library conference where the housekeeping announcement includes a lost cardigan! The lost cardigan was about the only thing that was to be as expected at this conference, given it was largely attended by librarians. I’ve never worked in children’s or school libraries so I looked forward to learning more about this world.

I was invited as CILIP’s President, and my badge said so! IMG_0541 Several people knew who I was & mentioned having read about me in Update; proof the magazine is a good communication channel.

This week has very much been Carnegie Greenaway award week. It started with the awards ceremony on Monday, & my introduction to the infectious, enthusiastic world of youth & children’s libraries. It ended with the Lightbulb Moments: Powered by Librarians conference in Harrogate. This was a co-produced conference organised by School Libraries Association – the other SLA in my life – (@uksla) and CILIP’s Youth Library Group (@youthlibraries) attended by 260 people. Mostly women, all avid readers, who do extraordinary work encouraging reading & info literacy skills in school age children.

The conference was over two days, with two dinners. I missed the first, with the theme of Harry Potter, & included a quiz. The second was attended by lots of authors & had honorary memberships announced. Always good to celebrate the sterling work done by members & supporters.

What I liked:
– The splendour of a big, Victorian hotel (the Majestic in Harrogate) faded in parts, but a glorious venue. Plenty of space, high ceilings and large rooms;
– The length of sessions, at least an 1 hour, was superb as it gave time to go into depth & really learn something especially when there was just one speaker;
– The mix of session format: some interview, plenary slots, others small group sessions.
– Mix of attendees: publishers, authors & librarians. I’ve never been to a conference where you can be a fan girl & interact with not one, but two children’s laureates.

What I felt could be improved:
– I didn’t get the impression there were many news professionals in the audience. This is something I’ve seen a lot at other conferences & would love to see here. It’s the main driver for succession planning for the profession. Does either SLA or YLG offer conference bursaries for those in the first five years of their career?
– Some people from outside the sector sharing their experience & case studies of how they’ve tackled questions like knowledge management & information literacy. I’m a firm believer in not re-inventing the wheel.

What I learnt:

  • Some great ideas from #amymckay14 on how to be a stealth librarian and get children into the library, examples included: accelerated reading club with millionaire club based on currencies around the world. KS4 story time club when you read picture books to them during exam time to relax them; for pupils joining the school visit them in their primary schools before they start secondary school and give them a book and activity sheet to complete over the summer; book quests -a great way to introduce information literacy skills such as using an index, skimming and scanning by giving questions to answer using books during library time.
  • There’s a place in schools for knowledge management. Darryl Toerien from Oakham School is doing sterling work on this by becoming the school’s curriculum expert. He’s mapping what is being taught in each subject by year group, and then ensuring there are suitable resources – in print and online- available to support the teaching. In some subjects information literacy instruction is becoming embedded in classes. It sounds very like work going on in academic liaison in higher education and in some workplace libraries. All very exciting stuff.

So all in all a great conference, in a stunning location of Harrogate, beautiful scenery on the journey there and fabulous architecture once I arrived.  Thank you to SLA and YLG for inviting me.

 

#blogjune: post 24: Lightbulb moments at YLG/SLA conference

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I have arrived in Harrogate to attend CILIP Youth Libraries Group (YLG) and School Libraries Association conference entitled  Lightbulb Moments: Powered by Librarians (#SLAYLG17).

I’m excited to be attending a conference in a sector I don’t have experience of. I’m aiming to learn a lot, talk to CILIP members and network.

I’ve got a couple of fascinating sessions this afternoon: on stealth librarian – encouraging young people to read – and planning for learning – how to tie library collections & management into the curriculum.

#blogjune: post 18: Right book, for the right child at the right time

As CILIP President I was lucky enough to be invited to the CILIP Carnegie Greenaway IMG_0513Medal ceremony on Monday. It was an extra special occasion as the Carnegie award was celebrating 80 years, while the Greenaway award is 60 years old. It was the most gloriously uplifting event I’ve been to in a long time. Beautifully compered by Cerrie Burnell, & included a magnificent poem by musician and educator Amy León.

 

Carnegie medal is awarded for an outstanding book written in English for children and young people.

IMG_0518It was won by Ruta Sepetys with Salt to the Sea, a fictionalised account of the worst maritime disaster in history. I can vouch for what a sensational and evocative read this is.

 

 

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Kate Greenaway medal is awarded for an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people. The winner was Lane Smith for There is a Tribe of Kids

 

 

 

There are also two Amnesty CILIP Honour commendations awarded to:

  • From the CILIP Carnegie Medal shortlist: Zana Fraillon for The Bone Sparrow, the story of a boy living in an immigration detention centre in Australia.
  • From the Kate Greenaway Medal shortlist: Francesca Sanna for The Journey, a picture book depicting a family fleeing their war-torn country in search of refuge.

All of the authors spoke eloquently & from the heart during their acceptance speeches. If only all acceptance speeches could be as well written & delivered. All stressing the importance of empathy. Several people made comments about how a good book and story can last a lifetime.  Books unite us, sharing stories and discussing history together results in empathy. Rita Sepetys summed it all up by saying ‘compassion has no borders’.

It was a beautiful celebration of the written word. It’s importance for children, & the role that authors, librarians & publishers have in ensuring the right book gets to the child at the right time.

The event itself was perfect & the organisers deserve real credit; thank you. RIBA works well as a venue, the surroundings are visually stunning & the space, as you’d expect from the architects’ professional association, is perfectly designed with a light and airy reception hall and outside terrace.

The addition of 100 school children, who had taken part in shadowing reading schemes, was a wonderful idea. They added another dimension to the proceedings. From ensuring loud cheering & whooping during the ceremony, to playing chase the author for an autograph during the reception.

This week marks the start of refugee week in the U.K, all the more fitting that three out of the four awards presented were stories of refugees and displaced children.